Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

NotoriousRBG

Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Irin Carmon & Shana Knizhnik
Dey Street Books
October 2015
Read for The 2016 YALSA Hub Reading Challenge
On the Amelia Bloomer Top Ten list

You probably recognize Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman in history to sit on the Supreme Court, by her small stature, her signature collars, her pursed mouth, or even from the online memes created to celebrate her in recent years. But if you are like me, you had no idea of the whole story. Luckily MSNBC reporter Irin Carmon and founder of the Notorious RBG tumblr, Shana Knizhnik, were here to educate me on all the ways that RBG and her work, even before joining the Supreme Court, has opened doors, knocked down walls, and sought to give women and men equal opportunities and rights (though admittedly we have a long way yet to go). The book is a mix of biography and legal history, covering RBG’s personal life and early career as well as her most famous and influential court cases.

Even more amazing to me than the accomplishments of RBG is the world in which she started her career. As a millennial woman, I knew in a vague way that women didn’t always have the opportunities that I have today, but I had no idea how bad it was. Notorious RBG lays it all out: losing your job for getting pregnant; forced abortions for women in the military even while abortion is illegal in the rest of the country; women unable to get a job to support themselves and their children after a husband dies; working women dying and their husbands not getting to collect benefits because the law assumes no women work; and the list goes on and on. RBG made it her life’s work – starting with her positions at the ACLU and teaching at high-profile law schools and still today with her seat on the Supreme Court – to make the U.S. a better place for women than it was when she was growing up but doing so while also fighting for the equal rights of all people. She is also such a character. From her relationship with her husband to the way she treats her clerks to her personal style, she is a class act and a shero of the highest order.

This book is well researched and readable. The chapter titles come from Notorious B.I.G. lyrics and there is tribute art sprinkled throughout the book. In addition to notes and citations, it has some fun back matter like “How to Be Like RBG” and “R.B.Juicy,” parody lyrics to Notorious B.I.G.’s song “Juicy.”

I don’t have any read alikes for this book, so here are some favorite quotes:

“The pedestal upon which women have been placed has all too often, upon closer inspection, been revealed as a cage.” (Chapter 4, location 1054 in Kindle edition)

“If women are to be leaders in life and in the military, then men have got to become accustomed to taking commands from women, and men won’t become accustomed to that if women aren’t let in.” (Chapter 5, loc. 1550 in Kindle edition)

“Someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability. And to help repair tears in her society, to make things a little better through the use of whatever ability she has.” (Chapter 10, loc. 2633 in Kindle edition)

Audacity

audacity

Audacity
Melanie Crowder
Philomel
January 2015
Read for The 2016 YALSA Hub Reading Challenge
On the YALSA list of Top Ten Best Fiction for Young Adults

Melanie Crowder’s novel in verse tells the story of Clara Lemlich, a women’s labor activist in New York City at the turn of the 20th century. We follow Clara from the Russian shtetl where her family was the victim of pogroms to Ellis Island and a new but still impoverished life in New York. With her father and three brothers occupied studying Torah full time, Clara and her mother must find ways to earn money to support the family. Clara finds work in garment sweatshops with abusive managers, unreasonable hours and quotas, locked doors, child laborers, and unsafe working environments, all to earn less than $10 a week. Seeing the injustice and danger in working in such conditions, Clara sets out to unionize the female workers. She is met with opposition from her family, the men’s union, the managers, and their hired goons who beat her up on several occasions, but she won’t be silenced. At great personal cost, Clara perseveres and makes greater gains than her doubters could have imagined. While Clara’s story is compelling – even more so with the modern fight for wage equality and raising the minimum wage – the end of the book is unsatisfying and feels a bit unfinished. Extensive back matter elaborates on Clara’s story and labor issues of the time.

Clara’s family’s Jewish traditions and lifestyle were particularly interesting to me. I’m currently living in Jerusalem and am learning so much about the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. Much of it is unchanged from what the book describes in the early 1900s. Still today it’s very common for the men in ultra-Orthodox families to study Torah while the women of the family are the main providers, both financially and domestically, usually for families with 6 or more children. In Israel, the government has a welfare system to make sure these families don’t starve, but it is expensive and these families still live in relative poverty. Keeping Kosher while traveling and working on Shabbat are other issues that modern Jews still deal with, though access to packaged food and labor laws regarding religion make these much less of a big deal than they were for Clara’s family.

My other takeaway from this book – I’m shocked by how much Clara gets beat up! There is some serious violence against women in this book, and it is just amazing to me how this doesn’t scare Clara into silence. She really was so brave. She deserves to be held up as an example of standing up for what you believe in.